Git

GitLab - Your Own Private GitHub by Eric on February 1, 2020

![](/img/gitlab_0.png)GitHub is great for open source projects and if you haven't been there to see what's going on you're missing out.  They offer free git hosting for all of your open source projects.  Their UI is great for tracking issues, commits, users, updates, and so much more.  But let's say you want to use all of that great UI on a project you don't want open source.  That's when you'll need to pay GitHub for a few private repositories.  Or maybe you want to create an organization for you and your developers to create private projects and manage larger applications across many repositories.  You'll need to pay for that too. Those prices can get pretty steep.  Luckily for you there is an open source solution to GitHub called GitLab.  It runs on Ruby and you can set it up all by yourself by following these GitLab Installation Instructions.  That assumes you have a server ready to serve and work for you.  If you don't you can quickly set up a great Amazon EC2 instance and in...

Getting Started with Programming by Eric on February 1, 2020

A friend of mine called me up recently to ask me how to get started with programming. I've gotten these requests more and more as the demand for programmers rises. I'm going to compile a list of resources to help anyone get started with what I feel are the basis for what anyone who wants to program will need. This list is by no means comprehensive and while this will get you started you should not feel like you can go from knowing nothing to building the next Facebook simply by following this guide. It will, however, give you a solid foundation with which you can build and grow to the point where you could potentially build something like Facebook or Instagram on your own or working with a small team.Which Language Should I Learn? This depends entirely on what you are trying to do. Some people want to make their work life more efficient by writing small programs to automate their daily tasks while others may want to create websites and web applications. For the first I suggest Pytho...

How to Install SmartGit on Ubuntu by Eric on February 1, 2020

I've found that a lot of things on Ubuntu are very easy to install but there are some trickery ones that if you don't know the procedure can be a pain to get up and running on a new installation.  Here is a quick setup guide for getting SmartGit installed on a fresh Ubuntu installation. 2. Install the Java Runtime Environment from here.  http://apt.ubuntu.com/p/openjdk-7-jre 4. Install Git with the command sudo apt-get install git-core 6. Install Mercurial with the command sudo apt-get install mercurial meld 8. Download and install SmartGit per their instructions on their site That's all there is to it.  Hope this helps both myself and anyone else looking for a quick guide to get SmartGit up and running.

Accessing a Git Repository Using a Key Pair by Eric on February 1, 2020

We recently moved our git repositories over to Amazon Web Services.  We ran into one issue with it which was that now our git requests needed to have a key pair attached.  The Internet was not very kind on explaining how to do this very well so I'm documenting it here. The key pair you'll want to use is the one generated for you by AWS.  It is the same one you use when you ssh into your AWS EC2 instances.  Take this key pair file, which I will call keypair.pem from now on, and we'll need to move it and configure our git to use it. 2. Copy the keypair.pem into your .ssh folder.cp /path/to/file/keypair.pem ~/.ssh/keypair.pem 4. Create/open your .ssh config file.nano ~/.ssh/config 6. In your config fileHost git Hostname EC2PublicDNS User ubuntu IdentityFile /home/username/.ssh/keypair.pem 8.  To clone the repository use the followinggit clone git:path/to/projects/PROJECT_NAME.git 10. To update existing projects on your machine to use the new address follow the instructions be...